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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS


 


JEFFERSON FULL STEPS • This refers to Jefferson Nickels with Full Steps that are Graded "FS", "5FS" and "6FS" - i.e.: the number of complete, detailed Full Steps on the front of the Monticello building, found on the reverse of Jefferson nickels from 1938 through 2003. This is a designation given only to Mint State coins. Currently, NGC and ANACS are the only Reputable Grading Companies that Grades Jefferson Nickels in each numbered category. ANACS, grades Jefferson Nickels in 5FS, 5.5FS, and 6FS. PCGS Grades Jefferson Nickels as "FS", meaning Full Steps or Five Steps. PCGS does not, at this writing, differentiate between 5 Steps and 6 Steps.

These Special Coins are "Few and Far Between" - Very Difficult to Find, and are obviously Very Rare. There can be no significant impediments to the steps. Any cross marks or "Bridges", other than superficial, will eliminate this special designation. Generally 5 Steps Jefferson's are found 1:20, or one in twenty nickels; and the "6FS" is very rare. The FS or 5FS Jeffersons can exist between 2%-20% of a paticular year, but 5% is the average over all. This seems to be higher prior to 1950. The percentage of the Jefferson 6 Steps is, perhaps, 10% of the number of 5 Steps coins Graded - or from 2/10ths of 1% up to 2% overall - which is Extremely Rare, and therefore accordingly expensive


1982 LINCOLN Cents •- Partway through production of 1982 Lincoln cents, the U.S. Mint changed the coins' composition from brass (95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc) to one that is predominantly zinc (a core of 99.2 percent zinc and 0.8 percent copper with a copper barrel plating). Cents dated 1982 come in both metallic varieties - and to complicate matters even more, there are large-date and small-date versions in both compositions. Viewed side by side, the large and small dates are relatively easy to tell apart, and there isn't much difference in individual values (price), since both are quite common.

Distinguishing between the brass and zinc cents is almost impossible, unless they are weighed.  They are  easier to distinguish by weight, rather than by color: The brass cent is heavier, at 3.11 grams versus 2.5 grams for the zinc cent. Again, both kinds are common. In all, there are seven (7) different varieties of 1982 cents. Just one combination is missing: There is no small-date cent in brass (also called bronze) from the Denver Mint.

In 1982 the US Mint made 7 different Lincoln Cents. Their different compositions included bronze or copper (3), and zinc (4); some dates are large (4), and some dates small (4). Prior to 1982, pennies were 95% Copper and 5% zinc. After 1982 the composition became 97.6% zinc and 2.4% copper.

 

2009 Lincoln PennyIn 2009, the United States Treasury created a special set of Lincoln Pennies - a Set of four (4) coins, both P&D, highlightening Lincoln's live:  Childhood; Formative Years, Professional Years; and Presidency.  Each coin has a different design and setting on the reverse.  The obverse is a standard continuation of the typical Lincoln Cent.  Although they are all made of the same Bronze formula, there is a Proof edition entitled "Bronze", and a Proof edition entitled "Bicentennial".  There is also a Mint State "Satin Finish" in "SP" numbered coins, and standard "Business Edition", designated as "MS".

 

 


SILVER WAR NICKELS • More than 66 years ago, World War II (WWII) required large amounts of copper and nickel, primarily for ammunition and guns. This necessitated removing these metals from the production of Jefferson Nickels and Lincoln Pennies, by the US Treasury. From 1942 through 1945, all Jefferson Nickels produced by the United States, were made of Silver.
There are 11 Total Coins in a Set of Silver War Nickels – 1942 PS, 1943 PDS, 1944 PDS, 1945 PDS. You will find the Mint Marks moved to the Reverse, and located above the dome of Thomas Jefferson’s extraordinary home, on his plantation in Monticello. Monticello was sometimes called the “Southern White House”.
These coins are Very Rare, and are Difficult to Find, especially in the better grades (MS64-MS67). Their Value, and thus their Price, reflect this factor. There are also only a few Coin Collectors and Investors who can Appreciate and Afford such a Collection. The Value of such a Set is, of course, Greater than the Total of each coin Individually.
A Collection, such as this, benefits greatly from continuous yearly Appreciation, which enhances their Tremendous Value; as any Proud owner will tell you.


WAR PENNIES • More than 66 years ago, World War II (WWII) required large amounts of copper and nickel, primarily for ammunition and guns. This necessitated removing these metals from the production of Jefferson Nickels and Lincoln Pennies, by the US Treasury.

In 1943, all Lincoln Cents produced by the United States (1943 PDS), were made of steel. In 1944 and 1945, all Lincoln Cents were made of "shell casings" from spent or fired ammunition. There are 9 Total Coins in a Set of War Pennies – 1943 PDS, 1944 PDS, and 1945 PDS. Unlike the Jefferson Nickels, the mint marks were unchanged and remained in the same location.

These coins are Very Rare, and are Difficult to Find, especially in the better grades (MS64-MS67). Their Value, and thus their Price, reflect this factor. There are only a few Coin Collectors and Investors who can Appreciate such a Collection.
The Value of such a Set is, of course, Greater than the Total of each coin Individually.

 This Collection, also, benefits greatly from continuous yearly Appreciation, which enhances their Tremendous Value; as any Proud owner will tell you.



 

Copyright (c) 2007-11 Robert L Taylor, JD; All rights reserved.
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